Our Results

The evidence demonstrates that students who have met with a College Advising Corps adviser are more likely to aspire to go to college, participate in college-prep activities, apply to colleges, be accepted to college, and be committed to going to college in the fall.

In total, our advisers held the following:

  • 353,695 one-on-one meetings with students
  • 100, 836 group meetings
  • 16,354 parent meetings

In doing so, our advisers helped the following:

  • 67,322 students register for the ACT or SAT
  • 44,579 students with college applications
  • 16,134 students receive a college application waiver
  • 38,659 students complete a FAFSA

Compared to seniors who have not met with the College Advising Corps adviser, students who have met with the College Advising Corps adviser are

  • 30% more likely to apply to a college or university
  • 18% more likely to apply to 3+ institutions
  • 24% more likely to apply to a first choice college
  • 26% more likely to submit the FAFSA
  • 18% more likely to have heard of Pell Grants
  • 18% more likely to take the ACT
  • 14% more likely to take the SAT

Preliminary evidence from our randomized controlled trial in Texas shows that graduating seniors from College Advising Corps schools are more likely to go to college and complete an application to a 4-year college. Hispanic students and students receiving free/reduced price lunch are most strongly impacted by College Advising Corps advisers.

Our Stanford University evaluation team also used National Student Clearinghouse data to conclude that 74 percent of the students we serve who enroll in college persist through to the second year. Even though the schools we serve have larger proportions of low-income and first-generation college aspirants, our persistence rate is on par with the national average of 72 percent.

In 2013-2014, 86 percent of seniors in the schools we serve met with an adviser at least once.

These findings suggest that College Advising Corps advisers are doing an effective job of targeting students, as the students with whom they have met are more likely to be first-generation college goers and to be concerned about financing their college education. Furthermore, students who have met with a College Advising Corps adviser are more likely to aspire to go to college, participate in college-prep activities, apply to colleges, be accepted to college, and be committed to going to college in the fall.

Our impact is also measured in intangible ways.

Sometimes it is hard to quantify “success” in our schools. I think that numbers tell us a really good amount about our students and about where they’re going after school, but “success” is pretty individual. For example, success to one student might mean going to an open house and visiting a school or it might mean simply learning how to apply; to another student it might be filling out ten applications by October 1st and going to the school of their dreams; for that other student, it just might take them a little bit longer to get there, but I think there’s no one way to measure these achievements. It’s just individual.
Kathleen Dollard, Adviser at Huntingdon
Area High School (Huntingdon, PA)